Types of Shingles for Roofing

Shingles are more than the “hair” to your house’s “head.” Although usually just simple, rectangular shapes placed in an overlapping pattern on your roof, shingles aren’t nailed onto your roof purely for their aesthetic appeal. Crafted to be highly resistant, they work to protect your home from the daily onslaught of weather and nature. Whether it’s raining or snowing, whether the trees are showering your home with acorns or the squirrels trampling across, shingles are there to protect the roof from damage. Of course, over time, they can be worn down or destroyed. Whether you’re replacing an old roof or building a new home, consider all the types of shingles for roofing. Each type comes with its own pros and cons.

Types of Shingles for Roofing

Types of Shingles for Roofing

Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt shingles are the most common types of shingles for roofing in America. Inexpensive and easy to install and repair, these shingles are made with a mat that is coated with asphalt. They are waterproof and resistant to fire, but they will wear down over time. Asphalt shingles are best suited to areas with consistent weather and they work well as long as their hydrocarbons are in place. Over time these granules will soften and fall off, exposing the surface and nail heads to potential damage. Depending on the quality of the shingle and your climate, you can expect them to stay in good shape for about 15-20 years.

Types of Shingles for Roofing

Wood Shake Shingles

Usually made of cedar, spruce, or pine, these attractive and insulate shingles are textured on the front and smooth on the back. Like all wood, they will fade in color—they start brown or reddish brown but will usually fade to a more grayish color. Over time, wood shakes will expand, so they are never placed directly next to each other. Individual shingles will sometimes need to be replaced due to warping, shrinking, or splintering, but wood shake shingles can last about 25-30 years before needing to be replaced. The key is maintenance. These shingles must stay dry, so you will need to routinely clean off leaves, debris, and dirt that might trap moisture, and you might look into treating it before it is installed to help extend its life.

Types of Shingles for Roofing

Slate Shingles

Slate stone shingles are incredibly durable (they can last over 100 years!), but they’re also very heavy and difficult to install and repair. Slate breaks more easily than asphalt or wood and it requires a special cutter for sizing. It can also be damaged if walked upon, so you should always contact a professional for repairs. Depending on the quality, they can be quite expensive, but they also require little maintenance. If you have the money, choose a careful roofer, and don’t walk upon these shingles, slate is the toughest and longest-lasting type of shingle.

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Your choice of roofing shingle depends largely on four factors: expense, maintenance, appearance, and longevity. If you need something inexpensive, go with asphalt. If you’re wanting a certain look but also want something that will last a long time, try wood shake shingles. If money isn’t a problem and you want a roof that might even outlive you, go with slate. And if you really can’t decide but you’re looking to repair or replace your roof (and you live in the Springfield area), give Adam Cowherd Construction a call at 417-268-7199. We would be happy to help.